SENTENCES AND PHRASES, MONEY – SÄTZE UND REDEWENDUNGEN, GELD

SENTENCES AND PHRASES, MONEY – SÄTZE UND REDEWENDUNGEN, GELD

SENTENCES AND PHRASES, MONEY – SÄTZE UND REDEWENDUNGEN, GELD

Excuse me, please, where is the nearest bank? (polite) . . . . . . Entschuldigen Sie, bitte, wo ist die nächste Bank?
What do you need? (polite) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Was brauchen Sie?
I would like to change some money. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ich möchte etwas Geld wechseln.
There is a bank on the other side of the street, on the right. . . Da ist eine Bank auf der anderen Seite der Straße, rechts.
What is the rate of exchange today? /
 How stands the exchange rate today? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wie steht der Wechselkurs heute?
It’s 1.22 dollars per euro. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Er ist ein Dollar zweiundzwanzig pro Euro.
I would like to buy euros. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ich möchte Euro kaufen.
How many? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wie viele?
I would like to change 100 dollars. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ich möchte hundert Dollar wechseln.
I would also like some coins, please. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ich möchte auch Kleingeld, bitte.
There you are. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bitte sehr.
Thank you very much. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Danke schön.

A very important rule in German is that in statements, the verb is in the second place. (For questions, the verb usually is first.) This does not mean that the verb is the second word in the sentence, but rather that it is the second “unit”. The first place in a sentence can be occupied by a word or a phrase. If the first place is occupied by the subject (with or without adjectives that describe it), then the second place is occupied by the verb. If the first place is occupied by something other than the subject (such as a time adverb like “yesterday” or a phrase like “after the party”), then the verb comes second and the subject comes after the verb.

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